Linda Y. Cureton is the Chief Information Officer (CIO) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). As NASA CIO, she provides the requisite leadership to transform the management of information technology (IT) capabilities and services to support and enable NASA's mission. She ensures that the Agency's information resource management (IRM) strategy is in alignment with NASA's vision, mission, and strategic goals. Accordingly, Ms. Cureton ensures the development of integrated IRM strategies, including standards, policies, NASA Enterprise Architecture, IT security, management, and operations. She has the responsibility, authority and accountability for ensuring that NASA's information assets are selected, controlled and evaluated consistent with federal policies, procedures, and legislation. Ms. Cureton was appointed as the NASA CIO in September 2009. Prior to this appointment, Ms. Linda Y. Cureton served as the CIO of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and led the Information Technology and Communications Directorate. As the GSFC CIO, Ms. Cureton was responsible for ensuring that GSFC's information assets are acquired and managed consistent with Agency and Federal Government policies. She was responsible for ensuring that the Center's Information Technology strategy aligns with NASA's vision, mission, and strategic goals. Prior to her arrival at GSFC, Ms. Cureton was the Deputy Chief Information Officer of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) and led the Office of Science and Technology as Deputy Assistant Director. The Office of Science and Technology is responsible for providing leadership in the innovative and efficient application of science and technology used to collect, clarify, and communicate information needed to reduce violent crime, collect revenue and protect the public. As the ATF Deputy CIO, she was responsible for ensuring that the use of Information Technology for the Bureau's mission and business requirements fulfill customer and stakeholder needs. Previously, Ms. Cureton served in executive positions at the Department of Energy and the Department of Justice. As a strong advocate for the practical application of technology, she has served as a member of organizations such as the Government Information Technology Investment Council, the American Council for Technology, and Women in Technology. Ms. Cureton earned a Bachelor of Science Degree from Howard University in 1980 graduating magna cum laude with a major in Mathematics and a minor in Latin. She also received a Master of Science Degree in Applied Mathematics from Johns Hopkins University in 1994, and a Post-Master's Advanced Certificate in Applied Mathematics from Johns Hopkins University in 1996. She performed extensive research in numerical analysis and has been published in the "Journal of Sound and Vibration." She currently resides in Maryland with her husband and mother.

Facing Our Cyber Insecurities – How To Really Make a Difference

NASA CIO Linda Cureton shares her views on cybersecurity and the role everyone plays in staying protected.

Cloud Computing: Bull, Silver Bullet, or Silver Lining?

I suppose you can’t have a Shoot Out about Cloud Computing without talking about Silver Bullets. So, bang, bang, here goes! There is a lot of discussion about Cloud Computing and it has become a very popular term. Because of this, there is a lot of confusion about the definition of this evolutionary computing capability. Nevertheless, the confusion and hype do not negate the significant benefit that this technology offers. Grave budget problems are forcing most Chief Information Officers (CIOs) to seriously look at these capabilities and their potential to save costs. Furthermore, the Obama Administration, through the Office of…

True Transparency and Naked Leadership

There is much discussion about transparency in government especially as it relates to Web 2.0 tools such as blogs, twitter, and various social networking applications. Transparency in a literal sense simply means to be able to see right through something. Definitions and common understanding in a government context varies. It would be a mistake to consider transparency purely in the technology context of Web 2.0 tools. It should be considered from a personal leadership perspective. And personal could mean you as a leader or you and your organization. But, this means more than just putting data up on static websites,…

The Relevant CIO

Much will be said over the next few weeks about the role of the CIO in the Federal Government. Oh, many folks have already gotten together to discuss such things. Eventually, I think it boils down to one basic principle: The CIO must be relevant. But what must a CIO do to be relevant? I suppose that it may be a bit irreverent to suggest, by implication, that the CIO has been not relevant. Perhaps. But relevance is relative – and varies from CIO to CIO according to her mission. Consider this Esai Morales quote: I love being irreverent. But…