FedScoop http://fedscoop.com Federal technology news and events Mon, 24 Nov 2014 17:33:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Watch FedTalks 2014′s Cybersecurity Fireside Chat http://fedscoop.com/watch-fedtalks-2014s-cybersecurity-fireside-chat/ http://fedscoop.com/watch-fedtalks-2014s-cybersecurity-fireside-chat/#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 17:33:21 +0000 http://fedscoop.com/?p=65931 Bobbie Stempfley, deputy assistant secretary for cybersecurity strategy and emergency communications at the Department of Homeland Security, discusses her agency's cyber strategy with moderator Robert Potter, vice president of federal sales for Symantec, during FedTalks 2014's cybersecurity fireside chat.

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Bobbie Stempfley, deputy assistant secretary for cybersecurity strategy and emergency communications at the Department of Homeland Security, discusses her agency’s cyber strategy with moderator Robert Potter, vice president of federal sales for Symantec, during FedTalks 2014′s cybersecurity fireside chat.

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Pentagon eyes large-scale, persistent imagery surveillance http://fedscoop.com/intelligence-community-eyes-large-scale-persistent-surveillance/ http://fedscoop.com/intelligence-community-eyes-large-scale-persistent-surveillance/#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 12:00:10 +0000 http://fedscoop.com/?p=65864 The Defense Department wants the ability "to stare" at targeted locations on the globe for long periods of time. But the technology it hopes one day will lead to a revolution in space-based imagery surveillance is already a reality.

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Even with a $50 billion intelligence budget and the ability to target digital communications all over the world, the U.S. intelligence community still faces one major gap in its surveillance capabilities: persistent satellite-based imagery.

Persistent surveillance, or the “ability to stare at a location” for long periods of time, remains one of the Pentagon’s pressing technological challenges, said Michael Vickers, the Defense Department’s undersecretary of defense for intelligence, speaking Nov. 19 at a military strategy summit in Washington, D.C. “We’re trying to create persistent surveillance from space,” he said, rather than having to wait for satellites to be retasked or to fly over a particular part of the globe. “It will be a leap in overhead reconnaissance” that will take more than a decade to accomplish, Vickers said.

But the technology necessary to achieve persistent surveillance already exists, and the infrastructure to begin capturing a picture of the entire Earth every day is within a year of being in place.

Leading the charge into this new frontier is a small San Francisco-based startup, Planet Labs Inc., founded by a team of former NASA scientists. In February, the company launched the world’s largest constellation of Earth-imaging satellites, which it calls “Doves.” The 28 systems that make up the company’s first “flock” of satellites are a fraction of the size of traditional satellites, measuring a mere 10 by 10 by 30 centimeters and weighing only 4 kilograms (compared to traditional satellites that average 30 square meters in size and weigh several tons).

Perhaps more important than the efficiencies promised by Planet Labs’ Dove satellites, when the company completes its deployment of 100 Doves in the next year, they will enable scientists to capture a picture of the entire Earth — every day. And while the company’s focus has been strictly on non-military applications, including studying deforestation and agriculture, disaster response and other scientific applications important to understanding changes that could impact life on the planet, the technological advancements it has introduced prove the Vickers’ desire for the Pentagon to be able to “stare” at one place on the Earth for days or months at a time is not as crazy as it might sound.

Planet Labs’ co-founder and CEO Will Marshall detailed the capabilities of the Dove systems at TED2014 in Vancouver, British Columbia. “So what’s standing in our way?” asked Marshall, referring to the goal of being able to image the entire Earth on a daily basis. “Satellites are big, expensive, and they’re slow,” he said. And if scientists want to understand what’s happening on Earth more regularly, more satellites are necessary. But the current satellite model just isn’t scalable.

Marshall held a Dove satellite in his hand for the TED audience to see. “Even though this is really small, this can take pictures 10 times the resolution of the big satellite,” Marshall said.

Marshall and his engineering team built the first Dove satellite in a Silicon Valley garage — a first for a space company. And one of the keys to the company’s engineering success is something familiar to an increasing number of federal agencies — agile development. “We rapidly prototype our satellites,” Marshall said. “We use release early, release often on our software. And we’ve learned to manufacture our satellites at scale. We call it agile aerospace.”

With more than 100 Doves planned for launch, they satellites will provide “a completely radical new data set” about the health of the planet, said Marshall. The systems will be deployed in a single orbit fixed plane with respect to the sun, allowing the Earth to rotate beneath the string of satellites. The cameras will scan across the Earth as it rotates. “The Earth rotates every 24 hours, so we scan every point on the planet every 24 hours. It’s a line scanner for the planet,” Marshall said.

The key, however, to the images taken by the constellation of Doves is that they don’t take a picture of any point on the planet every day, but a picture of every point on the planet every day. “We’ll be able to track urban growth as it happens around the whole world, in all cities, every day,” Marshall said. “From water security to food security, we’ll see crops in all of the fields on every farmer’s field every day.”

For Marshall and Planet Labs, this new data set will be used to take care of the planet. But as he ended his TED talk, Marshall left the audience to ponder a profound question: “If you had access to imagery of the whole planet every single day, what would you do with that data? What problems would you solve? What exploration would you do?”

We know what the Pentagon’s Vickers would do.

Here’s a look at Marshall’s TED2014 talk.

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What does the Pirker ruling mean for the FAA and drones? http://fedscoop.com/pirker-ruling-mean-faa-drones/ http://fedscoop.com/pirker-ruling-mean-faa-drones/#comments Sun, 23 Nov 2014 23:58:26 +0000 http://fedscoop.com/?p=65890 In the wake of a recent ruling, members of industry are calling on the FAA to use its regulatory authority of unmanned aerial vehicles to encourage innovation.

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A Ritewing Zephyr style aircraft. Credit: Wikimedia

A Ritewing Zephyr-style aircraft. (Credit: Wikimedia)

Industry representatives are calling on the Federal Aviation Administration to stop penalizing unmanned aircraft enthusiasts and instead to use its regulatory authority to encourage innovation in unmanned aerial vehicles.

Last week, the NTSB overturned an administrative law decision that threw out a $10,000 fine the FAA issued to Raphael Pirker, who operated a Ritewing Zephyr remote-controlled plane “recklessly” above the University of Virginia. Pirker was reportedly operating the craft, which was equipped with a video camera, for a third party and was taking photos and video of the campus below, according to the NTSB filings.

“I don’t think our resources should be put toward stifling the economy that will benefit from UAVs,” Michael Drobac, the executive director of the Small UAV Coalition told FedScoop. “I think we should put our resources to being creative, coming up with solutions to any problems that exist today, to testing to ensure that the companies can operate.”

Pirker had argued that the FAA didn’t have authority to regulate his craft’s flight because it was not technically an aircraft.

“In this regard, respondent argued the aircraft was a ‘model aircraft’ not subject to the regulatory provisions applicable to ‘aircraft,’” the NTSB brief said. “After considering the parties’ written submissions on the motion, the law judge concluded in his decisional order the Zephyr was a ‘model aircraft’ to which [the regulations] did not apply.”

By overturning the law judge decision, the NTSB essentially ruled that remote-controlled planes, or UAS, do in fact classify as aircraft and are in fact under the regulation of the FAA.

“The National Transportation Safety Board affirmed that the agency’s position that unmanned aircraft systems meet the legal definition of ‘aircraft,’ and that the agency may take enforcement action against anyone who operates a UAS or model aircraft in a careless or reckless manner,” a statement from the FAA said.

Drobac said that the FAA treated the NTSB decision like a victory because now the agency has judicial proof that they have authority over drones.

“The question I would ask is a victory for whom?” Drobac said. “To me, the answer is that it takes the attention and resources and mindshare that should be given to how do we expedite advanced testing and operation of UAVs in the national airspace, rather than how do we figure out a way to find more people who are trying to use UAVs for efficient operation in a variety of industries.”

The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International President Michael Toscano told FedScoop in an email statement that the FAA’s consideration of safety is important but that the agency should use the opportunity to get its rule on small UAS out as soon as possible.

“The ruling underscores the need for the FAA to immediately move forward with its small UAS rule making and to finalize the rules as quickly as possible,” Toscano said. “Until the rule is finalized, U.S. businesses will be unable to realize the benefits of this technology.”

Alan McQuinn, a research assistant at the Information Technology Innovation Foundation, agreed. McQuinn said the agency should enforce safety standards for commercial and recreational drones.

“What it should not do is try to create de facto rules through litigation,” McQuinn said. “Instead, it should expedite its commercial drone ruling to invite public comment, making the process open and transparent for everyone.”

The FAA’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, or NPRM, on small UAS integration is expected sometime next month. According to a source familiar with the situation, the White House is currently reviewing the NPRM before issuing an executive order on drones and privacy also next month.

The NTSB also sent the case back to the administrative law judge to determine whether or not Pirker had been operating the device in a “careless or reckless” nature.

 

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NASA supercomputer creates hypnotic visual of Earth’s CO2 http://fedscoop.com/nasa-supercomputer-carbon-dioxide/ http://fedscoop.com/nasa-supercomputer-carbon-dioxide/#comments Sun, 23 Nov 2014 23:37:39 +0000 http://fedscoop.com/?p=65861 Who knew computer models could be so mesmerizing? The GIF above comes from a NASA video, after NASA scientists created a visualization of how carbon dioxide moves through Earth's atmosphere.

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NASA

Who knew computer models could be so mesmerizing?

The GIF above comes from a NASA video, after scientists at the Goddard Space Center created a visualization of how carbon dioxide moves through Earth’s atmosphere.

The model, known as “Nature Run,” takes atmospheric data related to greenhouse gas emissions and then simulates the natural behavior of the Earth’s atmosphere. Created with NASA’s GEOS-5 supercomputer, the model is among the highest-resolution viewpoints ever created. NASA said Nature Run has 64 times greater resolution than most global climate models.

“While researchers working on [Observing System Simulation Experiments] have had to rely on regional models to provide such high-resolution Nature Run simulations in the past, this global simulation now provides a new source of experimentation in a comprehensive global context,” NASA scientist Bill Putman, who was the lead on the project, said in a release.

The model, which simulates May 2005 to June 2007, shows how carbon dioxide moves across the world from its initial source. In the visual above, Putman describes how plants in the Northern Hemisphere absorb a large portion of CO2 during the spring months, as well as the introduction of carbon monoxide into the atmosphere from fires in Africa and South America.

NASA plans on combining the computer models with observations made by the agency’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 atmospheric satellites in order to better understand what drives large concentrations of carbon dioxide.

Researchers have been testing Nature Run for several years, but they presented their first full look at the models during the SC14 supercomputer conference in New Orleans this week.

“We’re very excited to share this revolutionary dataset with the modeling and data assimilation community and we hope the comprehensiveness of this product and its ground-breaking resolution will provide a platform for research and discovery throughout the Earth science community,” Putman said.

For a closer look at the model, check out the videos below.

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Clear Government Solutions gains FedRAMP approval http://fedscoop.com/clear-government-solutions-fedramp-jab-ato/ http://fedscoop.com/clear-government-solutions-fedramp-jab-ato/#comments Sun, 23 Nov 2014 23:35:39 +0000 http://fedscoop.com/?p=65885 Clear Government Solutions has obtained a FedRAMP Joint Authorization Board Provisional Authority to Operate, FedScoop has learned.

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Clear Government Solutions has obtained a FedRAMP Joint Authorization Board provisional authority to operate, FedScoop has learned.

With the authorization, agencies across the federal government are free to procure the company’s Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) architecture for their cloud computing needs.

Prior to the authorization, Clear Government Solutions has been among a handful of companies that had been granted a blanket purchase agreement through the General Services Administration for its Web hosting, storage and virtual machine offerings.

Clear Government Solutions President Chris Grady told FedScoop that obtaining the JAB was “not easy.” The review process took months and required more than 700 pages of security documents.

“It is one of the most rigorous processes you can go through in terms of assessing your infrastructure,” Grady told FedScoop.

However, with authorization in hand, Grady said he “felt privileged” to go through the process.

“I know there is a lot of angst out there in the marketplace, but frankly, having gone through the process, [FedRAMP] is one of the best-run organizations, federal or commercial, that I’ve ever encountered,” he said.

For more information, visit the FedRAMP website.

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NCI: Consumer health big data needs clinical validation http://fedscoop.com/nci-consumer-health-big-data-needs-clinical-validation/ http://fedscoop.com/nci-consumer-health-big-data-needs-clinical-validation/#comments Sun, 23 Nov 2014 23:25:38 +0000 http://fedscoop.com/?p=65847 Millions of Americans swear by their fitness apps and wearable health tracking devices. But researchers at the National Cancer Institute are hesitant to conclude this wearable tech revolution is clinically effective.

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wearable-health-data

(iStockphoto.com)

With millions of Americans using fitness apps and tracking devices that count thousands of steps, keep tabs on weight and diet information, and record other consumer behavior information, there’s more data than ever to enhance a person’s health decisions. But researchers at the National Cancer Institute are hesitant to say this wearable tech revolution is clinically effective.

James McClain, program director of NCI’s Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch within the National Institutes of Health, said Thursday as part of a health IT panel that his institute is a major supporter of the growing infrastructure on connected health devices and applications, especially the data they generate. On a scientific level, though, he questioned, “Do we know if any of this works?”

“I would say anecdotally, we believe a lot of this works, and we have a lot of faith and confidence and belief,” McClain said. “But that doesn’t move the process forward as fast as it might.”

“It doesn’t take much to convince the consumer these days. Consumers believe, on a lot of these sorts of technologies and devices, that they will help them,” he said. “So there’s a lot of faith on the consumer side.” On the clinical side, however, it’s an entirely different story. “I think that’s why there’s some pause and some caution on the concept of patient-generated data,” he said. “How do we understand what it means?”

Rather, McClain said the focus should be on the “validation and evaluation of evidence generation,” and with the right funding, “that’s where a biomedical research institute like NIH can play a big role.”

“I’ve been pushing us to try to shift our focus in more of a clinical direction and less of a generalized public health assessment focus, cause we do, we support, we fund a lot of tremendous methodological work in those areas, and it’s probably time to turn it towards more of the individual user where we’re going to have this actionable data,” he said. That means setting up an IT and systems infrastructure that can process that data and make sense of it all. And in some cases, it could be as easy as inserting a clinical algorithm in the background of an app or device. It’s also scalable and replicable.

“A lot of that infrastructure, technology, systems, components we need to build, is identical when you look at cancer prevention or you look at heart disease, diabetes or any other chronic diseases we’re facing … any other health behavior,” McClain said. “What are the core components of analytic and IT systems we need to manage the data flows? We’re all talking about different sorts of data we want to potentially feed to clinical systems. But functionally, many of the components of that are sensible or usable and they are not something that have to be built a hundred times by a hundred different institutes or centers.”

The role NCI, other national health institutes and other federal health-focused agencies must take is complementary, building the systems to process that data — “Eighty to 100 Hz, just ridiculous data volumes, terabytes and terabytes of data,” McClain said — for their own purposes. Trying to standardize or change the consumer health industry will not help the cause.

“They’ll do greater things than we can do because they’re just going to have the venture capital investment and other sorts of things in that direction that drive innovation, and we don’t have that kind of money to put behind it,” he said.

But if NCI can capture more data, McClain said, he believes they might be able “to pick up the features and aspects of movement profiles, of sleep profiles, or other aspects of daily interaction that might actually be the signal rather than the noise.”

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Multinational group discusses open data for Earth observations http://fedscoop.com/multinational-group-discusses-open-data-earth-observations/ http://fedscoop.com/multinational-group-discusses-open-data-earth-observations/#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 20:31:31 +0000 http://fedscoop.com/?p=65774 Representatives from the multinational Group on Earth Observations met in Geneva last week to examine how open Earth observation data integration could benefit thousands of people globally.

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Representatives from the multinational Group on Earth Observations met in Geneva last week to examine how open Earth observation data integration could benefit thousands of people globally.

Participant countries “discussed strategic approaches to ensure that GEO continues to contribute to resilient societies, sustainable economies, and healthy environments,” Tim Stryker, the director of the White House’s Office of Science and Technology’s U.S. Group on Earth Observations, wrote in an email to FedScoop.

He added that in the coming year, GEO will focus on regional initiatives to build capacity for the more effective use of Earth observations data and information.

Founded in 2005, GEO’s 177 member organizations connect technological tools around the world that can monitor and predict the state of Earth’s land, waters and atmosphere.

The U.S., which has a permanent position on the GEO’s Executive Committee, maintains one of the world’s largest collections of Earth observations, gathering data from networks of satellites, ocean buoys, stream gauges and human surveys. But Stryker said the value of this data extends far beyond the policy of the United States.

“Open, machine-readable, and interoperable Earth observation data collected and shared by GEO member nations and organizations is a valuable resource for governments, organizations, researchers, firms, and individuals around the world,” Stryker, whose agency supports the country’s interactions with GEO, said in a blog post about the most recent meeting.

The U.S. has been working to manage its Earth observation programs more efficiently. In July 2014, the National Science and Technology Council of the Executive Office of the President released the National Plan for Civil Earth Observations, a guide for future federal investments and strategic partnerships to advance Earth observing systems. The plan also promotes the use of data-management principles for the information.

The Obama administration has placed a strong emphasis on open data throughout federal government. The president issued an executive order last year pressing agencies to establish an open data policy, making more information and data sets accessible to the public.

Recently, Obama said at the United Nations Climate Summit in New York that the United States has plans to release elevation data for most of the Earth’s land surface. In September 2014, elevation data for the African continent were released, and the U.S. has plans to periodically release other regional data sets. By September 2015, the U.S. aims to have a global elevation data set available for public use.

This initiative was praised highly by the international development community when it was announced in September and last week by the GEO representatives in Geneva.

“These data will improve understanding of environmental change and societal ecosystem and vulnerability in countries worldwide, and their release underscores the U.S. commitment to address the environmental impacts of extreme weather and climate change,” Stryker said of the elevation data in a recent blog post.

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VA releases commercial scheduling RFP http://fedscoop.com/va-releases-commercial-scheduling-rfp/ http://fedscoop.com/va-releases-commercial-scheduling-rfp/#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 15:59:46 +0000 http://fedscoop.com/?p=65848 The Veterans Affairs Department released the long-awaited request for proposals today for the commercial scheduling system that will replace the agency's existing patient scheduling module, which was at the center of a nationwide scandal involving falsified wait times and veteran deaths.

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The Veterans Affairs Department released the long-awaited request for proposals today for the commercial scheduling system that will replace the agency’s existing patient scheduling module, which was at the center of a nationwide scandal involving falsified wait times and veteran deaths.

VA detailed its new Medical Appointment Scheduling System, which will replace the patient scheduling module within the Veterans Information System and Technology Architecture, VA’s main electronic health record system known as VistA. Contract documents describe a five-year effort with two option years and a maximum total value of up to $690 million.

“When it comes to the care of our Veterans, we want the best technology the American marketplace can provide,” VA Secretary Robert McDonald said in a statement. “A new and innovative scheduling system is an essential tool we must have in place to enable us to provide our Veterans with timely and high quality health care.”

The VA wants the new system to:

  • Standardize and improve scheduling processes and workflows.
  • Provide the ability for all organizational levels to manage demand, supply and utilization of resources.
  • Provide the capability to standardize data and business rules across the enterprise.
  • Enable efficient centralized and decentralized scheduling programs.
  • Enable greater automation, efficiency, reliability and oversight.
  • Meet congressional and other external stakeholder reporting requirements.
VA MASS scheduling

(Credit: fbo.gov)

“We are seeking vendors who will work closely with us and can meet our timeline,” VA Chief Information Officer Stephen Warren said. “We are dedicated to finding the right partner to help us create and implement our modern scheduling system.”

VistA’s scheduling module plays a much more fundamental role in the larger cycle of patient care and VA operations than many realize. VistA scheduling not only gets veterans appointments, but the data generated by the scheduling system is critical to the long-term management of VA’s medical practices and finances. Everything from health trends in specific populations of veterans to the amount of federal reimbursements provided to individual VA clinics is tied to the VistA scheduling system. Adding to the importance of a robust scheduling module are VA’s plans for telehealth, an army of home care providers that is offline in remote locations for extended periods of time, and the agency’s plans for mobile and Web-based self-service applications.

VA plans to take 30 days to evaluate written proposals before selecting the best options. Finalists will then be required to develop full demonstration versions of their system for evaluation by VA schedulers, according to Warren, who briefed reporters last week.

The VistA scheduling module is dependent on at least 31 current VistA software packages and plays a critical role in the continued operation of 71 different software packages within VistA, making incremental development and testing a critical component of the new MASS contract. “These dependencies represent over a thousand individual integration points,” the RFP states. “Data synchronization between MASS and VistA must be maintained, to support business processes dependent on appointment information.”

The RFP can be downloaded from the FedBizOpps.gov website. Proposals are due on January 9, 2015.

VA MASS architecture VistA

(Credit: fbo.gov)

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Watch the 2014 FedTalks Women in Tech Panel http://fedscoop.com/watch-2014-fedtalks-women-tech-panel/ http://fedscoop.com/watch-2014-fedtalks-women-tech-panel/#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 14:03:09 +0000 http://fedscoop.com/?p=65819 Women in tech was a major topic of discussion at FedScoop's FedTalks 2014.

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Women in tech was a major topic of discussion at FedScoop’s FedTalks 2014. During a panel with Dr. Alissa Johnson, deputy CIO of the Office of Administration for Executive Office of the President; Jennifer Sanchez, assistant director of the IT Customer Relationship & Management Division for the FBI; Vicki Schmanske, vice president for IT & Security Solutions at Lockheed Martin Information Systems & Global Solutions; and Teresa Carlson, vice president of Global Public Sector for Amazon Web Services, the four women discussed the challenges in persuading young girls to pursue careers in technology. During their chat, they debuted campaign #SmartIsBeautiful.

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FedScoop 50: Celebrating 2014′s leaders in federal IT http://fedscoop.com/fedscoop-50-celebrating-2014s-leaders-federal/ http://fedscoop.com/fedscoop-50-celebrating-2014s-leaders-federal/#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 13:28:03 +0000 http://fedscoop.com/?p=65813 As the calendar year soon comes to a close, FedScoop celebrated federal IT excellence Thursday night, announcing its 2014 FedScoop 50 award winners throughout government and industry.

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FedScoop50

From left to right: Col. Bobby Saxon, division chief, U.S. Army G-3/5/7; Goldy Kamali, CEO, FedScoop; Wolf Tombe, CTO, CBP/DHS; Alissa Johnson, deputy CIO, Executive Office of the President; and David Bray, CIO, FCC. (Credit: FedScoop)

As the calendar year soon comes to a close, FedScoop celebrated federal IT excellence Thursday night, announcing its 2014 FedScoop 50 award winners throughout government and industry.

After parsing more than 50,000 votes on thousands of nominees, FedScoop honored the 50 most renowned federal IT champions over the past year in front of hundreds of government and industry leaders gathered at the Hay-Adams rooftop, with gorgeous views of the White House, the Washington Monument and the southern Washington, D.C., skyline. Amid a night of decadence, awards were given in seven categories, starting with the most prestigious Golden Gov award and touching all aspects of the federal IT community, from Disruptor of the Year and Cybersecurity Leader of the Year to Industry Leadership and Most Inspiring Up & Comer.

A huge FedScoop congratulations goes out to all the award winners and finalists, and thanks for making 2014 an amazing year in federal IT.

The 2014 FedScoop 50 are:

Golden Gov — For the visionary leading government into a new technology landscape with innovative ideas and by inspiring others to get on board.

  • Terry Halvorsen, acting CIO, Department of Defense
  • Sonny Hashmi, CIO, General Services Administration
  • Frank Baitman, CIO, Department of Health and Human Services
  • David Bennett, CIO, Defense Information Systems Agency
  • Luke McCormack, CIO, Department of Homeland Security
  • Michael Daniel, special assistant to the president and cybersecurity coordinator, Executive Office of the President
  • Mike Krieger (Ret.), deputy CIO G/6, U.S. Army
  • Grant Schneider, deputy director for information management and CIO, Defense Intelligence Agency
  • Chad Sheridan, CIO, Risk Management Agency/Department of Agriculture

Federal Leadership — For the visionary leading government into a new technology landscape with innovative ideas and by inspiring others to get on board.

  • David Bray, CIO, Federal Communications Commission
  • Deborah Diaz, CTO for IT, NASA
  • John Edgar, vice president of information technology, U.S. Postal Service
  • Margie Graves, deputy CIO, DHS
  • Alissa Johnson, deputy CIO, Executive Office of the President
  • Marina Martin, CTO, Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Richard McKinney, CIO, Department of Transportation
  • Eric Nelson, director, Office of eDiplomacy, Department of State
  • Chuck Riddle, CIO, Government Printing Office
  • Col. Bobby Saxon, Division Chief, U.S. Army G-3/5/7
  • Nick Sinai, deputy CTO, OSTP, Executive Office of the President
  • Bryan Sivak, CTO, HHS
  • Wolf Tombe, CTO, U.S. Customs and Border Protection/DHS
  • Jack Wilmer, deputy CTO, Enterprise Services, DISA
  • Richard Young, director of IT policy & compliance, DHS

Industry Leadership — For the private sector pioneer driving change in government IT with unique solutions.

  • Teresa Carlson, vice president of global public sector, Amazon Web Services
  • Marilyn Crouther, senior vice president and general manager, HP Enterprise Services
  • Maj. Gen. John Custer (retired), director, Federal Strategic Missions & Programs, EMC
  • Kay Kapoor, president, AT&T Government Solutions
  • Jason Kimrey, area director of federal sales, Intel
  • Curt Kolcun, vice president of U.S. public sector, Microsoft
  • Thomas Romeo, president, Maximus Federal

Disruptor of the Year — Leading innovators not afraid to challenge conventional wisdom and shake up the status quo.

  • Ben Balter, government evangelist, GitHub
  • Mikey Dickerson, administrator, U.S. Digital Service, Executive Office of the President
  • Ronald MacKenzie, chief of business applications branch, RMA/USDA
  • Marsha Mullins, chief, JSJ6 DDC51/Joint Fires Division/DOD

Cybersecurity Leader of the Year —For the leader paving the way in cybersecurity innovation.

  • Greg Maier, CISO, Transportation Security Administration
  • Roberta Stempfley, deputy assistant secretary for cybersecurity strategy and emergency communications, DHS

Most Inspiring Up & Comer — Young leaders who did exceptional IT work this year and made you think, “They’ll be running the show someday.”

  • Mika Cross, workplace transformation strategist, Office of Personnel Management
  • Dr. Neil Evans, co-director of connected health, VA
  • Jennifer Gray, lead cloud enterprise architect, Office of Strategic Planning & Governance, HHS
  • Erie Meyer, administrator, U.S. Digital Service, Executive Office of the President

Tech Program of the Year — The best examples of influential tech programs that have led to cost savings, efficiencies and partnerships between agencies.

  • Enterprise Management Decision Support, U.S. Army G-3/5/7

Innovation of the Year — Technologies implemented this year that may have been unfathomable until recently.

  • Finder, DHS Science & Technology Directorate & NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

FedMentor of the Year- These busy leaders stepped up and took the time to share their very best practices, tips and career advice with the next generation of leaders.

  • Flip Anderson, acting associate CIO, Information Management Resources/USDA
  • COL Ken Blakely, commander, Command and Control Support Agency, U.S. Army G-3/5/7
  • Jonathan Cantor, deputy chief privacy officer, DHS
  • Camsie McAdams, acting director, Office of STEM, Department of Education
  • Ellen McCarthy, COO, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Tech Champion of the Year- For the leaders whose passion for tech made us all think outside of the box.

  • Hillary Hartley, deputy executive director, 18F, GSA
  • Robert Vojtik, director, End User Services Division, TSA/DHS

The post FedScoop 50: Celebrating 2014′s leaders in federal IT appeared first on FedScoop.

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